3.1e Inclusive numbers.

In braille an unspaced hyphen is substituted for a dash or a hyphen when print uses such punctuation to connect continuing or inclusive numbers. Example:

1970-1980 [or] 1970–1980 [or] 1970 - 1980

It is sometimes difficult to tell the difference between a print short dash (an en dash), a regular dash (an em dash), and a hyphen. A good rule of thumb is, if the words "to" or "through" can be substituted for the punctuation used between print numbers, scores, votes, etc., then a hyphen should be used in braille. Examples:

In braille an unspaced hyphen is substituted for a dash or a hyphen when print uses such punctuation to connect continuing or inclusive numbers. Example:

Mayor Is Victor: 1,258–895

Rams won 14—7.

See pages 28-64.

If, however, a dash comes between numbers but its purpose is to separate independent clauses, as in We eat at 8:00—8:30 is late, in braille the dash must be retained and the number sign repeated before the second number.

No space is left in braille between the hyphen and the closing parenthesis when a missing number is represented in print as a space. Example:

Susan Naidu (1966- )

Drill 8

Practice brailling the following sentences. In this, and all future drills, treat each sentence as a paragraph. Be sure to include the number and its period at the beginning of each paragraph. Leave one empty cell between the period and the beginning of the sentence.

Numbers in a printed listing are usually arranged so that the periods are in alignment. This is not so in braille. In braille, the number sign is placed in cell 3, followed immediately by the number—regardless of the number of digits in the number.

Try the drill in WESBraille.

Reading Practice

Try the Exercise in WESBraille.

EXERCISE

Try the Exercise in WESBraille.