13.2 Personal Initials [VI.27.c]

The initials of a person's name are capitalized, punctuated, and spaced as they appear in print. Like abbreviations in general, they should not be divided between braille lines if they appear in print unspaced. In the following example, because there is no space between the R. and the C., R.C. Cooper could only be divided after the R.C. A division could be made at any space in Mrs. P. G. Hall. Examples:

R.C. Cooper Mrs. P. G. Hall

Initials that are used for an entire name, as in J.F.K., should not be divided between braille lines whether they are spaced in print or not. Examples:

L.B.J. F. D. R.

Place a letter indicator before an initial that is not followed by a period so that it will not be read as a whole-word contraction. Example:

Harry S Truman

Initials followed by a period do not require a letter indicator. Therefore, in the sentence Ms. M. called today a letter sign is not needed. However, if the period is missing from the initial, a letter sign is needed to prevent it from being read as Ms. More. In the sentence "Let us call on Ms. M." it will not be clear to a braille reader whether the period denotes just the end of the sentence and is to be read as Ms. More or if it denotes an initial and is to be read as Ms. M. Thus, if the first time Ms. M. is mentioned the name occurs at the end of a sentence, the letter sign should be used to clarify the situation. When it is clear that the author uses the period with Ms. M., whether or not it occurs at the end of a sentence, the letter indicator may be dropped.